Blogging Blaffer

Thursday Links

Pia Rönicke, Outside the Living Room, 2000. Video [9:08]. Courtesy of the artist and gb agency, Paris. On view in Buildering: Misbehaving the City
Pia Rönicke, Outside the Living Room, 2000. Video [9:08]. Courtesy of the artist and gb agency, Paris. On view in Buildering: Misbehaving the City

Because we believe in paying attention to arts and cultural writing even when it’s not about us (and because we miss Tyler Green‘s links roundups on the currently on-hiatus Modern Art Notes), as part of Blogging Blaffer, we’ll regularly have a links edition highlighting some of what we’ve been reading, listening to, or looking at online:

Houston Chronicle columnist Lisa Gray on the virtues and rewards of giving challenging art (particularly abstract painting; even more particularly, Cy Twombly’s) a fair shake. (How could we at Blaffer not agree? One of many reasons we don’t charge admission is to encourage people to give art they’re not sure they’ll like a shot. Maybe even a second look.)

Houstonia arts editor Michael Hardy and Offcite editor Allyn West debate urbanism, transit, and related topics in “What’s the Matter with Houston?”

Uncrated, the Dallas Museum of Art’s blog, on the connection between one of its most prized paintings and the recent discovery of one of two ships submerged in the arctic waters off the Canadian coast.

As the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth prepares to open Urban Theater: New York Art in the 1980s this Sunday, Senior Curator Michael Auping remembers the “synthetic decade” in a lively interview with Arts+Culture Texas’s Leigh A. Arnold.

The Los Angeles Times’s Carolina Miranda on “the difficult nature of evaluating activist art: do we judge it on the way it looks? Or on the nature of the social change it creates?”

A few months old, but relevant to our Sunday opening of Buildering: Misbehaving the City: ARCHITECT magazine columnist Aaron Betsky says the Contemporary Arts Center Cincinnati’s debut presentation of the exhibition “puts a smile on your face and reminds you not to take architecture too seriously. It also shows that even the most serious architecture can be rescued from its monumental death-wish and death-grip on us with some inventive art making.”

The same goes for Jane Durrell‘s terrific interview with CAC Cincinnati Curator Steven Matijcio.

On that note, don’t forget to come to the brunch-time opening of Buildering this Sunday. Members preview the show starting at 11 a.m.; the public reception is from noon to 2 p.m. As always, the event is free, as is parking at UH on Sundays. See you there!







Sign Up for Our Newsletter

Contact

Phone: 713-743-9521
Mailing Address: Blaffer Art Museum
University of Houston
120 Fine Arts Building Houston, TX 77204